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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 43  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 127-134

Effects of truncal motor imagery practice on trunk performance, functional balance, and daily activities in acute stroke


1 Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Bengaluru Campus, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Neurology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
S Karthikbabu
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Bengaluru Campus, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-5009.190524

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Background: Motor imagery is beneficial to treat upper and lower limbs motor impairments in stroke patients, but the effects of imagery in the trunk recovery have not been reported. Hence, the aim is to test the effects of truncal motor imagery practice on trunk performance, functional balance, and daily activities in acute stroke patients. Methods: This pilot randomized clinical trial was conducted in acute stroke unit. Acute stroke patients with hemodynamic stability, aged between 30 and 70 years, first time stroke, and scoring <20 on trunk impairment scale (TIS) were included in the study. Patients in the experimental group practiced trunk motor imagery in addition to physical training. Control group was given conventional physical therapy. The treatment intensity was 90 min/day, 6 days a week for 3 weeks duration. Trunk control test, TIS, brunel balance assessment (BBA), and Barthel index (BI) were considered as the outcome measures. Results: Among 23 patients included in the study, 12 and 11 patients, respectively, in the control and experimental groups completed the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA, i.e., time* group factor analysis and effect size showed statistically significant improvements (P = 0.001) in the scores of TIS (1.64), BBA (1.83), and BI (0.67). Conclusion: Motor imagery of trunk in addition to the physical practice showed benefits in improving trunk performance, functional balance, and daily living in acute stroke.


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