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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 55-60

A study of type of aphasia in cortical and subcortical strokes


1 Department of Neurology, Kasturba Medical College, MAHE, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Neurology, Prime Hospital, Jalgaon, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Speech and Language Therapy, Kasturba Medical College, MAHE, Mangalore, India
4 Department of Radiodiagnosis, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Neurology, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Safwan Ahmed
Department of Neurology, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jss.jss_88_21

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Context: In the elderly stroke or stroke-related injury often results in cortical dysfunction termed as aphasia. This affects language usage and multiple aspects of communication. Comparative studies between cortical and subcortical lesions in aphasia are lacking. Aim: To study the type of aphasia in cortical and subcortical strokes. Settings and Design: Prospective observational. Subjects and Methods: Subjects with cortical and subcortical strokes of the dominant cerebral hemisphere were included in the study and divided into various aphasia types. Bedside language tests and distribution according to educational qualifications were performed. The subjects were assessed for aphasia scores and its association was performed with other baseline characteristics. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was expressed as a percentage and mean ± standard deviation. Kolmogorov-Smirnov analysis and Fischer's exact test or Chi-square test were used. Results: Significant difference was noted between the type of aphasia and age group in study subjects (P < 0.001). A severe form of language dysfunction like global aphasia was noted in subjects with a comparatively low level of education, with subcortical bleed, or those with left perisylvian infarcts. Subjects with diabetes and dyslipidemia had a higher risk of developing anomic aphasia (P = 0.02). Conclusions: This study showed the type of aphasia in subjects with cortical and subcortical strokes and it revealed that age at onset, level of education, and site of the lesion were associated with the outcome of patients of aphasia.


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