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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133-139

A study on predictors of nomophobia among undergraduate medical students of a Tertiary Care Teaching Institute in Kolkata, West Bengal


Department of Community Medicine, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Vineeta Shukla
Department of Community Medicine, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jss.jss_36_22

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Background and Objectives: Undergraduate medical students are more prone to develop stress, anxiety, and depression; and COVID-19 is an additional source of pressure for them. The present study was conducted with the objectives to estimate the proportion of nomophobia among undergraduate medical students of a tertiary care teaching institute in Kolkata and to find the factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: An observational study, cross-sectional in design, was conducted at a tertiary care teaching institute in Kolkata among 395 undergraduate medical students for a period of 8 weeks. Nomophobia Questionnaire scale was used to measure nomophobia. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 25.0. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression was performed to find the predictors of moderate and severe nomophobia. Results: All the medical students had some degree of nomophobia. About 26.8% of them had severe nomophobia, 61.3% had moderate nomophobia, and 11.9% had mild nomophobia. Age up to 20 years and the presence of addiction had statistically significant higher odds of severe nomophobia. Age up to 20 years, the presence of addiction, and up to 6 h' time spent per day with smart phone had significantly higher odds of moderate nomophobia. Conclusion: There was a high proportion of nomophobia among young budding doctors. Those who have already got moderate nomophobia should use smart phones more wisely and judiciously and avoid downloading addictive applications.


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